The better you write, the more you save.

February 16, 2010 at 7:08 am | Posted in social media | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Use a specialist. But only for the bits you can’t do.

I strive to improve my clients’ writing skills by imparting my expertise where possible.

One client has followed my advice and assembled a team of friends to vet his draft blog posts.

If his posts do start coming to me error free, their upload, tagging, hyperlinking and image sourcing should only take me 15-20 mins per post.

That’s around $30-40 per post.

And if it takes me less time, I’ll pass on the savings (as I only charge for time I actually work).

With this method, everyone’s a winner:

  1. My client improves his writing and saves money.
  2. His friends feel useful.
  3. His readers benefit from regular posts.
  4. His blog moves up Google’s food chain thanks to fresh content updates.
  5. I get regular small fees, instead of just a few (or even no) big ones.

So you see, there’s more than one way to flesh a blog! 🙂

Paul Hassing, Founder and Senior Writer, The Feisty Empire.

Organisational benefits of LinkedIn

January 14, 2010 at 7:58 am | Posted in social media | 6 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Professional connections thrive on LinkedIn. Pic by carolanross

I’ve noticed that one of my larger client’s staff are joining LinkedIn.

I consider this a very good thing, for several reasons.

If all the firm’s managers end up on LinkedIn, they can check each other out and get a better understanding of their various backgrounds and skills.

This could make it easier to assign the right people to projects.

It may also uncover special talents in the workforce the company never knew it had.

This client recently merged. I believe LinkedIn will foster harmony through understanding between members of the two former (and quite different) firms.

It’ll also help my client keep an eye on retrenched staff who may try to ‘augment’ their LinkedIn profile dishonestly by claiming false titles and expertise.

On the other side of the coin, my client could start an ‘alumni’ of good, friendly ex-employees his firm would be glad to have back if their circumstances changed.

This would be very much cheaper than searching for strangers from scratch with recruitment firms.

I’m sure plenty of more options and benefits will reveal themselves. The important thing is to be involved.

If you’re a biggish organisation (public, private or not for profit) LinkedIn is a good, professional forum for your people to gather in.

Paul Hassing, Founder and Senior Writer, The Feisty Empire.

Turn forums into temples

December 29, 2009 at 11:13 am | Posted in social media | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Photo by David Paul Ohmer

When searching online for the names of your organisation, products or services, keep a sharp eye out for forums. 

This is where people gather to praise, study, discuss or revile what you do. 

Often, you’ll see requests for help or information which the forum’s current participants can’t fulfil. 

According to Groundswell, if you provide a forum with free tips on how to solve outstanding problems with your goods, users will worship your brand and spread the word. 

You can do this task yourself, or delegate it to a product-savvy eager beaver in your organisation as a special assignment. 

The results may pleasantly surprise you.

Business Blogs


Entries and comments feeds.