The ‘other’ avatar

January 18, 2010 at 10:46 am | Posted in social media | 2 Comments
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Professional, but not stuffy. This avatar suits my diverse client portfolio.

When setting up a blog for a client, I ask them for a headshot to use as an ‘avatar’ on all their social media stuff.

It’s important to have a consistent image, so people start to recognise you around the internet.

As you post  and comment on your blog and others, adding your face each time builds your personal brand.

If you don’t have an avatar, go through your photos. See if you have something clean and clear (and appropriate!) that you’d be happy to use for the next 3-5 years.

If you’re unsure, follow the rules for passport photos and you can’t go wrong.

Once you have the file, it’s a simple matter to bung it on your blog.

If you don’t have a good head shot, you might think about getting some nice, professional photos done.

Humans are highly visual creatures. We judge each other in milliseconds. And we only get one chance to make a good first impression.

A shabby avatar can kill your power to turn strangers into prospects and prospects into clients. So it makes very good business sense to do it right.

If you have a team, you can save money by having them photographed at the same time.

Say cheese! 🙂

Paul Hassing, Founder and Senior Writer, The Feisty Empire.

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Social media spot check

December 29, 2009 at 3:13 am | Posted in social media | Leave a comment
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I’ve covered my most important bases. For now!

namechk.com searches all social media applications to see if your name’s being used.

The screenshot above shows how I’m doing. While it covers the most popular social media applications, you can also run the program for all 132 applications!

You’d do well to check out these applications to see who’s doing what with your personal, company and product names.

It’d also be a good idea to register (and thus lock down) free names in at least the really important channels (e.g. YouTube, Facebook, LinkedIn).

As this task would be more routine than expert (but still quite time consuming) it could be done cost effectively by an enthusiastic student with plenty of time on her hands.

Failing that, a junior IT person in your company could do it (and thus become a very valuable internal resource).

Failing that, I could do it myself.

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.


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