What does it cost to set up a blog?

January 30, 2010 at 10:47 am | Posted in social media | 6 Comments
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You need to know what you’re doing.

A client asked what I’d charge to set up a blog.

By the time I laid it all out in my email, I realised I had another post that might interest you.

Here’s what I wrote (with confidential details suppressed).

‘A blog for your firm and sector would be fabulous.

The topics would never end.

You could cover design, products, materials, trends, pitfalls, overseas directions, govt initiatives, case studies, happy campers – the works.

And every time there’s a media item about your sector, you’ll have another  blog post topic.

The way to go is to just make a start.

It takes me around 13 hours to set up a blog. This comprises:

  1. Naming.
  2. Registration.
  3. Template selection and configuration.
  4. Banner design.
  5. Welcome content.
  6. Tags.
  7. Avatar (profile pic) optimisation.
  8. Links.
  9. Amazon shop (optional – for passive income).
  10. Online ranking.

Each draft post you send me will take about an hour to optimise, illustrate and load on the blog.

So, you’d be up for around $1,560 + GST for setup.

Plus $120 + GST for each post (assuming you give me a reasonable bit of content to work up).

If you wish to proceed, we just move carefully through the ten-step setup process described above, ensuring you’re happy with each step and paying as you go.

If you have the time and inclination, I can train you or your representative to take over and run the blog at any time.

There are no software or hosting costs (unless you want to get fancy).

Even the pics are free, as I’ve started using Flickr. And I know you’ve got some killer photos in your kit bag.’

I hope you found that helpful or at least interesting.

Let me know!

🙂


If you found this content useful or entertaining, you may wish to:

Even a buck or three will keep me in the hunt. With many thanks, Paul.


 

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The ‘other’ avatar

January 18, 2010 at 10:46 am | Posted in social media | 2 Comments
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Professional, but not stuffy. This avatar suits my diverse client portfolio.

When setting up a blog for a client, I ask them for a headshot to use as an ‘avatar’ on all their social media stuff.

It’s important to have a consistent image, so people start to recognise you around the internet.

As you post  and comment on your blog and others, adding your face each time builds your personal brand.

If you don’t have an avatar, go through your photos. See if you have something clean and clear (and appropriate!) that you’d be happy to use for the next 3-5 years.

If you’re unsure, follow the rules for passport photos and you can’t go wrong.

Once you have the file, it’s a simple matter to bung it on your blog.

If you don’t have a good head shot, you might think about getting some nice, professional photos done.

Humans are highly visual creatures. We judge each other in milliseconds. And we only get one chance to make a good first impression.

A shabby avatar can kill your power to turn strangers into prospects and prospects into clients. So it makes very good business sense to do it right.

If you have a team, you can save money by having them photographed at the same time.

Say cheese! 🙂

Paul Hassing, Founder and Senior Writer, The Feisty Empire.

17 Blog improvement ideas

January 9, 2010 at 1:38 pm | Posted in social media | Leave a comment
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Small changes can make a BIG difference. Photo by rwpeary.

A while ago I was asked to critique a blog. While many of my suggestions were client specific, there were some I thought you might find useful.

This list shows the sort of feedback I can give on your blog.

  1. Changing/rotating banner pics are a nice touch. A small explanatory caption for each would be even better. Especially for first-time visitors.
  2. Once you delve into older posts, it can take time to get back to the start. It’d be nice if clicking the banner pic returned readers to the home page.
  3. Captions on post images would satisfy scanning readers, intrigue deeper readers and generally draw more people into each post.
  4. An avatar (profile) pic of unusual dimensions makes it hard to use in other social media applications (which will crop it).
  5. Clicking your avatar should lead to your bio.
  6. Inconsistent capitalisation may distract some readers from your message.
  7. Responding swiftly to comments can elicit others and build readership and community.
  8. Clicking the post photos makes them much bigger than expected (or needed). This could disadvantage readers with slower internet connections.
  9. Given this blog’s many components, a three-column design like this could work better than a two-column design.
  10. ‘Rollover’ comments (which appear when you put your cursor over a link – see my blogroll on the right of this page) let you know what you’re getting into before clicking through. Some people prefer this.
  11. Are you on Twitter? I couldn’t find a way to follow you. How do you announce new posts to the world?
  12. One post had two hyperlinks. One was embedded, the other wasn’t. The former is neater and should be used consistently.
  13. One photo acknowledgement took two lines, where one would suffice.
  14. Abbreviations (it’s, we’re, don’t) would make the tone friendlier (and the writing shorter and easier to read).
  15. Many of the photos are so beautiful, it’s a shame to have them so small. Putting them above the text would solve this problem.
  16. Some posts contain many passive constructions. The active voice is shorter and more ‘up’.
  17. Bullets are great. If you can left align them, they’ll remain distinct without looking cramped or consuming too much white space.

Was any of that useful? You can probably see I’m bringing my copywriting expertise to bear on the content.

And why not? Blogs are just another vehicle for interesting, relevant messages expressed in perfect English.

Did you want anything explained more fully? Just leave a comment; I’d love to hear from you! 🙂


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